Season of Pruning

I feel inadequate in talking about this passage because I know there are many branches within myself that the Lord is pruning – and I don’t like it.

The primary indicator for a season of pruning is the suffering of loss. A season of pruning brings a loss of finances, possessions, impact, influence, position, stature, relationship, or opportunity. To be pruned is to lose the basis upon which everyone around you measures you as successful. Various trials diminish resources and make secondary and less important pursuits impossible.

  • Pruning is often painful. Jesus understands pain and suffering, and that’s why He’s the perfect person to walk with us through that process.
  • Pruning can also bring grief. Sometimes we need to give ourselves permission to grieve what we are stepping away from or losing. Christ offers comfort and peace when we lean into Him.
  • Pruning requires courage. It’s hard to say no to good things. It’s difficult to step away from people, places and commitments that have been meaningful in a certain season of our lives. It’s a challenge to pivot away from something that was our passion or made us feel successful. Jesus serves up strength and provides confidence when we dwell with Him.

This intense intimacy of abiding in Christ can only happen if we allow Him to prune us – to form us to Himself. It is this exact process that makes us feel far from God and wonder if God is really there. I think that’s why it’s so hard for me to absorb this beautiful, intense invitation from Christ.

If God is going to cleanse something from you it means it is no longer in alignment with His will for you. Will you strive to make it work? Try and force the fruit? The longer you try to strain the fruit from something that is sick or dead the more you prolong the inevitable.

By allowing things to be trimmed off you and letting yourself be cleansed, you will be rejuvenated. You will gain clarity and purpose.

Jesus words invite us to draw our attention to God’s purpose in our pain. As you read the rest of this teaching, his message is clear: ABIDE in me. Instead of focusing on the pain at the end of our branches, Jesus calls us to look back to see we are still connected to the vine. Jesus is our vine. He is our grounding and stability. He is our connection to life and all good things. When we intentionally seek an awareness of our abiding connection to him, we can begin to trust that he has a purpose in our pain.

Jesus words invite us to draw our attention to God’s purpose in our pain. As you read the rest of this teaching, his message is clear: ABIDE in me. Instead of focusing on the pain at the end of our branches, Jesus calls us to look back to see we are still connected to the vine. Jesus is our vine. He is our grounding and stability. He is our connection to life and all good things. When we intentionally seek an awareness of our abiding connection to him, we can begin to trust that he has a purpose in our pain.

We continually ask God to fill you with the knowledge of his will through all the wisdom and understanding that the Spirit gives, So that you may live a life worthy of the Lord and please him in every way: bearing fruit in every good work, growing in the knowledge of God…

Colossians 1:9-10

-Natalie Derian